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Posts Tagged ‘asia’

It takes six weeks to build a ‘jingle truck’, the brightly decorated lorries that rumble through the city of Peshawar. Adnan Khan meets the men who paint them and discovers how their work reflects the inner lives of the drivers of these massive murals on wheels.

‘Think of it this way: when a man gets married, his bride is decorated for him – she is made as beautiful as she can possibly be. For a truck driver, his truck is his bride,” says Baqir Khan, a Pakistani trucker.

read full article |link|via The National .

Check out some more stunning pics of this unique art!

Jingle Trucks

https://i2.wp.com/lordaries.com/images/afghan/jingletruck2.jpg

https://i1.wp.com/gocomics.typepad.com/the_sandbox/images/2008/01/29/framed_beaird_jingle1_4.jpg

https://i0.wp.com/lordaries.com/images/afghan/jingletruck1.jpg

https://i1.wp.com/farm1.static.flickr.com/72/222169097_d9642fd85b.jpg

https://i0.wp.com/www.stevewiggin.com/Images/Photo%20Album/Jingle-truck_w.jpg

https://i1.wp.com/farm4.static.flickr.com/3646/3484125358_21110f9c1d.jpg

https://i2.wp.com/farm4.static.flickr.com/3044/2667319277_cf8126fc13.jpg

https://i2.wp.com/www.absolutelatitude.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/IMG_2700.jpg

https://i0.wp.com/aestheticsofjoy.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/riaz_trucks6.png

Framed_traversa_jingle_2_3

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In Asia, chickens with striking plumage have long been kept for ornamental purposes, including feather-footed varieties such as the Cochin from Vietnam, the Silkie from China, and the extremely long-tailed Phoenix from Japan. Asian ornamental varieties were imported into the United States and Great Britain in the late 1800s. Distinctive American varieties of chickens have been developed from these Asian breeds. Poultry fanciers began keeping these ornamental birds for exhibition, a practice that continues today. Individuals in rural communities commonly keep chickens for both ornamental and practical value.

 

From This !
To This !

Chicks in Bali

                                                                         

 

Farm owners insist the non-toxic dye is harmless and temporary, disappearing as the animals grow their new feathers.

“It’s something we’ve done at Easter time for the last few years,” Phyllis Burney, fiancee of owner Anthony Schmidt, told BBC News Online.

“It’s mainly for the children. They are quite in awe when they come to the farm and see the multi-coloured chicks.

Article bbc.co.uk[tweetmeme]

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